Best Blues Albums 2021: Top Full Review, Guide

Best Blues Albums

We are at the half-year mark, and it has been a reasonably strange year up to now. The coronavirus pandemic has ceased live music on its tracks beside the internet collection, and there have not been many album releases as usual. However, what we’ve had has been top-notch, and Fidlar has picked 15 of the Best Blues Albums. 

Best Blues Albums Of All Time

1. Jimmy “Duck” – Cypress Grove

Cypress Grove is a century-old tune, dusted off and shined up by Jimmy Duck Holmes, 72, since the title song of his fresh Dan Auerbach-produced gem of a record, set out by Dan on his Easy Eye Sound Records label. The Dark Keys front-man also utilized his own Nashville studio and encouraged some crucial elements to flesh this out rural bluesman’s raw sound.

Duck’s been working the Bentonia, Mississippi juke joint his sharecropper parents began in 1948 for seven days per week since 1972. “I did not know who Dan was,” admits Duck. He does today. Dan obtained the master percussionist Samm Baccoby the Nashville Symphony Orchestra.

Jimmy

He received a genuine died-in-the-wool delta bluesman (Mississippi Eric Deaton). He got recently minted electric Guitar Hero Marcus King.

He helped select stuff like Hard Times, that the 1931 n the haunted Skip James, and Robert Petway’s 1941 Catfish Blues, a tune both Muddy and Jimi coated. (Both James and Petway lived a stone’s throw away from Duck’s Delta blues juke joint.) It amounts to another notch in the belt worn by Auerbach, who’s proving himself an arbiter of taste and class. He is seen as one of the best blues artists.

2. Kris Barras Band: Light It Up

What about Kris Barras is a muscle, in your tendon-bursting riffs of Ignite into the Broken Teeth chorus, which reminds us all of his sidelines as a UFC killing machine (that I am never fearful of cracked knuckles and cracked teeth).

Light It Up

The finger-twisting down-home licks of Everything You Get suggest he has learned a thing or 2 out of fronting Supersonic Blues Machine reverse Billy Gibbons.

3. P.P. Arnold: The New Adventures Of

Having aired her long-shelved 60s stuff on 2017’s The Turning Tide, the 72-year-old soul singer could’ve returned, vindicated, and invested.

No opportunity. Arnold’s new songs are better from the yummy string cries of The Magic Hour that remember She’s a Rainbow into the thrusting modernity of Hold On To Your Dreams. This record should do the enterprise.

The New Adventures Of

4. Sunjay: Devil Came CaCalls

Sunjay copes in folk-blues with bite his cowboy strum, often belying some deliciously spiteful lyrics (How the hell can I’ve somebody as mean and awful as you? he wonders on Mean & Ugly).

At his best about the roll-and-tumble Mississippi Blues, state his acoustic command appears to be effortless, and Faith Healer is a wonder, too, albeit with all colors of David Brent.

5. Katey Brooks: Revolute

This Bristol-born singer-songwriter is larger than the blues label; her substance skips through rock, soul, and country, her subjects operate from MeToo to beyond shavings or her novelty.

However, Brooks’s unique bruised voice keeps you foot anchored in our genre, and about minutes such as The Sweetest Things, it is a snap to attention tool which could and ought to springboard her into great things.

6. Dion, Blues with Friends

With liner notes by Bob Dylan and a leading cast of blues musicians Van Morrison, Paul Simon, Patti Scialfa, and Bruce Springsteen, Joe Bonamassa, and Jeff Beck the list goes on, Dion’s new album is extraordinary.

His energy and enthusiasm for the blues have had early not diminished in his 81st year. Each track is a highlight, and it is an album you will want to return to again and again. As Dion states, The blues is a gorgeous kind of music that God gave to us.

7. Lucinda Williams, Very Good Souls Better Souls

Williams’ raspy, edgy growl adorns a bluesy, gnarly collection of apocalyptic tunes that explore a world coming apart. Since Jesse Malin said of it, a total of punk-rock power, It is like Muddy Waters meets the Stooges.

It is a badass record It is real, and it is raw, and Williams takes prisoners indeed, not Trump, who’s firmly in her landscapes in Man With No Soul. Allow me to remain fearless, she sings towards the close of the record, Allow me to remain strong. Her prayer’s been replied to in this album.

8. Marcus King, El Dorado

Initial rate collection of bluesy, soulful Americana out of a guy whose guitar chops and richly textured vocals are creating lots of individuals sit up and take note.

The group graced Eric Clapton’s Crossroads festival this past year, and this record is guaranteed to boost its standing even more. Produced and co-written using all the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, there is a nice balance of approaches, from strong blues-rock here in The Well into the late-night blues of Wildflowers and Wine into the 70s Southern stone of Sweet Marina.

Marcus King, El Dorado

9. Robert Cray Band, That Is What I Heard

Another superb offering of humor, R&B, and soul in the ever-consistent Robert Cray and his group. A 12 t12-track of both originals and covers of tunes you might not know, all delivered with Cray’s sweet vocals along with his clean as a whistle guitar tone. There is a beautiful dash of the gospel as nicely with Earth.

10. Albert Cummings, Believe

A record to savor from blues-rock artist and singer Albert Cummings. Recorded in Muscle Shoals, together with all the legendary Jim Gaines producing.

We now get six originals and five covers, including the lovely body of Van Morrison’s Crazy Love, delivered using a laid-back bluesy vocal performance backed up with a few sweet gospel vocals. There is also an excellent version of Wolf’s Red Rooster with a few muscular guitar work and lyrics to match.

11. Bob Dylan, Rough and Rowdy Ways

I thought long and hard whether to incorporate this in the preliminary list. It is not a blues record per se tunes like I Contain Multitudes and I Have Made up My Mind to Give Myself You are, like the rest of the paper, very brilliant, but indeed not blues tunes. On the other hand, Black Rider and GoodBye Jimmy Reed are for sure.

And then there is the gothGothicminute Murder Most Foul that might not be blues in shape but in lyrical content pretty much is. As is the rest of the record with its apocalyptic overtones and haunting questions such as, Can there be light at the end of the tunnel? Whatever the case, it is a royal piece of work in the 79-year-old, something of a masterpiece.

12. Robert Johnson – The Centennial Collection

At present, this is the very best re-master of the entire catalog. If it comes to acoustic blues associated with stone and since there are many breeds, Johnson must be the best.

70 or 80 percent of his tunes are classics that have been recorded countless times. His guitar style is, only, definitive. By Robert Johnson, you move around Chicago. You proceed around Muddy Waters. By Muddy Waters, you roll into Clapton and The Stones.

It is so stone and in its rhythmic content. It is not a contest, but I think that he was the best blues guitarist.

13. Muddy Waters – Sings Big Bill Broonzy/ Folk Singer

The reason I have chosen it’s that, as an introduction to acoustic blues, you have two records in one single here.

About the Folk Singer album, Buddy Guy is playing rhythm on acoustic guitar, Muddy on a slide, and Willie Dixon on bass. It is a moody recording that they had been attempting to enter the’60s music scene with it, so it’s instead a produced sound with a great deal of reverb. Nonetheless, it is an apparent record of an acoustic trio, and what a trio!

A very great record for individuals breaking to the style. Along with his singing on, it’s simply magnificent. It is a great album.

14. Blind Willie McTell 1927-33 The Early Years

There are several compilations on the market, but I’d pick the old catalog. Incredible 12-string participants played all types from deep, deep down into ragtime novelty.

He played slip, Very stone ‘n’ rounding its tone and rhythm. He is the author of Statesboro Blues, which The Allman Brothers coated; there was a sensible thing that they had that relates to him. Rory Gallagher, also.

Blind Willie McTell was unbelievable. Though he had been a street singer initially, he became a successful recording artist. As a young child, he learned Braille, so he understood music properly. He made some extraordinary records in that ancient time, and you can not be into acoustic without him.

15. Henry’s Funeral Shoe: Smart Phone Rabbit Hole

You will see Henry’s Funeral Shoe plugging in in in Wales faucet area and think to yourself: For fuck’s sake. Another sub-Stripes garage-blues duo. Two more troglodytes are beating away like it is 2003.

People who stay around, however, will discover that Aled and Brennig Clifford have more extensive thoughts, the brothers turning jet-black tales such as The League Of Gentlemen being egged on by Spike Milligan, put to a musical match formed by roots-mode Primal Scream, Stooges spit along with the horn traces of Exile On Main St.

It has kept them maybe by option but guarantees SmartPhone Rabbit Hole is as engaging as the record name (a dig phone-swiping zombies). Everybody Says High and Hello Shoulders Everywhere equally exceptional route-one stompers capture listeners settled.

Still, the gamut is the thing that impresses, together with Right Time’s mournful state soul, the scuzz-punk of Quick As A Hiccup along with the mandolin kiss-off of Ball & Chain. Henry’s Funeral Shoe maybe five distinct bands, all of them excellent.

FAQs

1. How much is Stevie Ray Vaughan’s guitar worth?

Fender Strat, Stevie Ray Vaughan $623,500
After Stevie died in a helicopter crash in 1990, Stevie’s brother Jimmy donated the guitar, which was auctioned off and sold to Guitar Centre.

2. Is Albert King related to BB King?

King often said he was born in Indianola and was a half-brother of B. B. King, although the scant surviving official documentation suggests otherwise on both counts. King carved his indelible niche in the blues hierarchy by creating a deep, dramatic sound widely imitated by both blues and rock guitarists.

3. Does Eric Clapton still play?

Rock star Eric Clapton has said damage to his nervous system makes it difficult to play the guitar. The acclaimed musician told Classic Rock magazine he can still play but added hard work. I’ve had quite a lot of pain over the last year.

4. Where was Texas Flood recorded?

Los Angeles, It was produced by the band and recording engineer Richard Mullen; Texas Flood was recorded in the space of three days at Jackson Browne’s recording studio in Los Angeles.

5. What does Born Under A Bad Sign, mean?

The bad sign is an astrology reference: if you’re Born Under A Bad Sign, it means the stars are aligned against you from birth. The song’s co-writer William Bell came up with the title – he wanted to do a blues song about astrology. Born Under A Bad Sign was Albert King’s first album released by Stax.

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